Sad Sundays

I’ve always thought of Sundays as a little sad.  When I was a kid, it meant whatever cousins had come to visit for the weekend had to go home; it meant the end of the weekend and the beginning of the school week; it meant the end of fun and back to the grind.  As an adult, my perception of Sundays hasn’t changed. 

We had a fabulous weekend with friends of ours who last year moved two hours away to a college town.  They have a lovely home outside of town and there’s a creek on the backside of their property.  It’s so utterly scenic, they should charge us for staying the weekend.  I think if I lived there I would be utterly and totally at peace.

In fact, driving out there yesterday morning, I came to the conclusion that part of the stress I’ve been experiencing lately is due to not getting out of the city in so long.  I love getting out to the pastures and farm land and corn fields.  A couple of years ago when I was in NYC, I stood on the sidewalk gazing up the skyscrapers and precious few trees and wondered how far I would have to drive before I saw any farmland or a cow?  I’ve told people about that experience, and I think they thought I was crazy.  “I must say, I’ve never wondered about cattle when I’ve been in the Big Apple” or “With all there is to see, you couldn’t stop thinking about pastures??”  Yes, I confounded my friends.  I finally stopped telling people.  It was an odd experience.  I love NYC and plan to visit again and again; it really has nothing to do with the city itself.  It’s more about me, and where my spirit is.  And believe me, the revelation has surprised even me.

When I was younger, I couldn’t wait to leave the country, move to the city, get where the action was.  I wasn’t going to be held back by some small-town, I was going places.  So now I’ve spent more of my life living in cities than I did living in the country, but I find myself drawn to it like a touchstone.  I need that time to help ground me, literally.  It feels like the pull of generations.  

I don’t think I could give up all the conveniences of city life, though.  Maybe one of these days, but for now I’d like the best of both worlds.  Sort of like my friends have.  Smaller but good sized community, and living on the outskirts of that.  As I listen to the sound of traffic outside my window, the wheels are turning, trying to formulate a plan of possibilities.

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under family, job search, life, travel

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s